Course Offerings - Winter Quarter 2017


ENG 105-0-20: Expository Writing

Class Meetings: TTH 11:00-12:20

Instructor: Corinne Collins

Expository writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. While all students will further develop their ability to write analytical and persuasive essays, students who are non-native writers of English will have the opportunity to focus on further developing their ability to write these academic essays in English. Because all students will meet regularly with the instructor in individual conferences, non-native English speakers will get individualized attention on writing grammatically correct English prose.

ENG 105-0-21: Expository Writing

Class Meetings: MWF 1:00-1:50

Instructor: Anne Boemler

Course Description: Expository Writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. Students write three or four extended pieces of expository writing, developing each through a process of planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Students also complete several briefer exercises in which they experiment with specific writing techniques or use informal writing as a tool for exploring ideas. Class meetings are conducted as seminar discussions and workshops. In addition, the instructor meets regularly with students in individual conferences.

ENG 105-0-22 Expository Writing

Class Meetings TTH 3:30-4:50

Instructor: Susanna Sacks

Expository Writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. Students write three or four extended pieces of expository writing, developing each through a process of planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Students also complete several briefer exercises in which they experiment with specific writing techniques or use informal writing as a tool for exploring ideas. Class meetings are conducted as seminar discussions and workshops. In addition, the instructor meets regularly with students in individual conferences.

ENG 105-6-20: First-Year Seminar - Chicago Voices: Learning about Chicago

Class Meetings: TTH 9:30-10:50

Instructor: Jeanne Herrick

Media hoaxes, copies, and remixes have existed for centuries. But is anything different about these phenomena in our digital age? For instance, since it’s so easy to copy and remix digital data, do we do so more often? Do people feel pressure to make things up because they must produce content more frequently, faster, and across more platforms than ever before? Do technology and its crowd-sourcing capabilities render lies and thefts easier to uncover? In this course, we will explore answers to these questions as we examine several historic and contemporary examples of hoaxes, copies, and remixes. We’ll ask questions about both the positive and negative aspects of such examples with the ultimate aim of discovering what they can show us about broader concepts such as individuality, uniqueness, and authenticity. Students will also have the opportunity to engage in independent research on a hoax, theft, or remix of their choosing.


ENG 105-6-21: First-Year Seminar - Literatures of Addiction

Class Meetings: MW 2:00-3:20

Instructor: Kathleen Carmichael

Ever since Pentheus’ fatal decision to spy on the revels of Dionysus, audiences have had a guilty fascination with the spectacle of addiction—a fascination which crosses not only centuries but disciplines, captivating scientists, policymakers, philosophers, artists, and laypeople alike. This class will trace the evolution of literary representations of addiction across several centuries, from classical depictions of god-induced madness, through the Gothic narratives of Poe and Stevenson, temperance classics such as Ten Nights in a Barroom (whose impact has often been compared to that of Uncle Tom’s Cabin), to the twentieth- and twenty-first century comedies and confessionals that make the bestseller lists today.  Through these readings and related critical texts, we will examine the ways that such literature provides a staging ground for public controversy and emerging theories about the artistic, cultural, ethical, and scientific significance and ramifications of addiction.

ENG 105-6-22: First-Year Seminar - Writing about Diversity, Identity & Community

Class Meetings: MW 3:30-4:50

Instructor: Penny Hirsch

What creates community, why is community important, and who is considered a member? How does community affect identity, and in a democracy, does diversity enhance or challenge community? In this course, you will explore what you believe about community; consider the kind of community you have, or want, at home and at Northwestern; and then look more broadly at specific forces that build or erode community. In this last area, we will examine the exploding prison population that threatens American communities and local programs designed to counter that trend. Toward the end of the course, you will do a final project that considers community in relation to a field of your choice, such as journalism, law, medicine, public policy, or higher education. At the same time, as we encounter the different genres in which people write about community--e.g. personal narratives, opinion pieces, academic studies--you will acquire techniques for becoming a more flexible and effective communicator, and thus a more powerful advocate for your values and beliefs.

ENG 105-6-22: Spies, Sleuths, & Suspense

Class Meetings: MWF 11:00-11:50

Instructor: Phyllis Lassner

This seminar will explore the many entertaining and serious meanings embedded in detective and spy novels and films. We will discuss and write about such topics as suspenseful action, elusive characters, deception, and challenging endings.

To discover these many meanings, we`ll address such questions as: What makes detective and spy fiction so riveting? Why are questions of disguised personal identity, mysterious legacies, political loyalties, treachery, and heroism suspenseful, chilling, and so popular?

How do the historical settings and imagined political conflicts affect the shape and meanings of popular thrillers?
THERE WILL BE OCCASIONAL FILM SHOWINGS ON TUESDAYS AT 6:30 PM

ENG 106-1: Writing in Special Contexts – Joint w/ DSGN 106-2
Design Thinking and Communication (DTC), is a required two-quarter course for all first-year students at McCormick. It is also available to any Northwestern undergraduate student interested in design. Every section is co-taught by an instructor from the Writing Program and an instructor from engineering. Part of the Engineering First® curriculum, the course immediately puts students to work on real design problems submitted by individuals, non-profits, entrepreneurs, and industry members. In DTC, all students design for real people and communicate to real audiences.
ENG 205-0-20: Intermediate Composition

Class Meetings: MWF 11:00-11:50

Instructor: Charles Yarnoff

The goal of this course is to develop your ability to write clearly, persuasively, and interestingly for a variety of audiences.  Students will learn techniques for writing effective informative, reflective, persuasive, and research essays.  These techniques include the effective use of specific details; methods of organizing ideas clearly; strategies for editing sentences for clarity and conciseness; and ways to give your writing a distinctive voice.  Students will submit drafts and revisions of essays.

ENG 205-0-21: Intermediate Composition - From Story to Argument

Class Meetings: TTH 9:30-10:50

Instructor: Kathleen Carmichael

This course examines the intersection of story and argument, both to investigate how creative storytelling may provide the inspiration for argument and to examine how effective writers and researchers may be seen to build their arguments (legitimately or otherwise) on the foundation of story.  Readings will range from discussions of the graphic novel to considerations of how everyday citizens manipulate social media to tell the stories they desire. We will also look at case studies that illustrate how the ever-widening gulf between the stories told by specialists and non-specialists plays out in the public sphere and the making of public policy. 

This course is recommended for students who wish to refine their mastery of the essay form while experimenting with a range of creative approaches to articulating arguments and persuading audiences.  Key assignments will require research into a question of the student’s own choosing, refined and developed over the course of the quarter.  Students are welcome to use this class to deepen their explorations of research problems that they may have begun investigating in other classes or contexts.

ENG 205-0-22 & 23: Intermediate Composition

Class Meetings: MWF 10:00- 10:50 & MWF 11:00-11:50

Instructor: Marcia Gealy

The philosophy behind this course, to use Donald Hall’s words, is that "reading well precedes writing well." Students will read exemplary models of expository prose as a way of provoking ideas and encouraging effective written communication.

ENG 282-0: Writing & Speaking in Business

Class Meetings: TTH 12:30-1:50

Instructor: Barbara Shwom

Across all industries, employers consistently rank written and oral communication in the top five skills that a new employee needs. However, employers also say that students overestimate their ability to communicate effectively in a workplace context. English 282 is designed to address that gap. The course is designed to help you think strategically about communication, make effective communication decisions, and produce writing and presentations that are well-organized, clear, and compelling. In addition, course assignments provide an opportunity to enhance your critical reading and thinking; your ability to communicate effectively about data; your understanding of visual communication; and your understanding of interpersonal communication.

ENG 304-0-20: Practical Rhetoric

Class Meetings: T 6:00- 8:00

Instructor: Barbara Shwom / Elizabeth Lenaghan

Course Description: Practical Rhetoric is a course designed to prepare good writers to work as peer tutors in the Writing Place. The course covers composition and tutoring theory and techniques for working with writers at a range of levels, in a range of disciplines, and at various points in the writing process. The course will also give you an opportunity to learn techniques for working with international student writers for whom English is a foreign language. Enrollment is by permission only, for students who have applied to be Writing Place tutors and have been accepted into the program. For information about applying to be a tutor, go to http://www.writing.northwestern.edu/working-at-the-writing-place/undergraduate-students/.